Publications

2008
Occasional Papers, No. 2: Incorporating Labor and Human Rights Risk Into Investment Decisions
Aaron Bernstein. 9/2008. Occasional Papers, No. 2: Incorporating Labor and Human Rights Risk Into Investment Decisions. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Mainstream investors for the first time are beginning to assess labor and human rights factors as a way of increasing returns and lowering risk as part of a broader movement in the investment world to include corporate environmental, social, and governance (ESG) behavior into portfolio and lending decisions. However, the paper also describes why investment analysis of labor and human rights poses some of the most difficult challenges in the emerging ESG field.
Capital Matters Newsletter
7/2008. “Capital Matters Newsletter” (Vol. 1, No. 4 ). Publisher's VersionAbstract
•Experiments in Public Sector Pension Fund Design 
•Accounting for Pension Fund Risk and Reward 
• A Code of Conduct for Pension Trustees 
• CEO Pay as a Proxy for Good Corporate Governance 
• Defined Benefit and Defined Contribution Investment Returns Compared
• Labor, Human Rights and Investment Risk 
Arnold M. Zack. 5/30/2008. “International Legal Standards for Labor and Employment Law.” In Workplace Fairness Disputes in a Global Economy: Hong Kong and PCR Perspectives. Hong Kong. Publisher's Version
Arnold M. Zack. 5/19/2008. “Using Mediation to Resolve Workplace Disputes in China.” In Mediation in Hong Kong:The Way Forward. University of Hong Kong Law School: Hong Kong International Arbitration Centre. Publisher's Version
Richard B. Freeman. 4/2008. “2008 Universities set the pace in labor relations.” Harvard Community Resource. PDV Version
Capital Matters Newsletter
4/2008. “Capital Matters Newsletter” (Vol. 1, No. 3). Publisher's VersionAbstract
•Understanding the Turmoil in Financial Markets 
• ...What to Do 
• 401(k)s Fall Short of Funding an Adequate Returement 
• Can VEBAs Alleviate Retiree Health Care Woes 
• SEffective Labor Representation on Pension Boards 
Occasional Papers, No. 1: Can VEBAs alleviate retiree health care problems?
Aaron Bernstein. 4/2008. Occasional Papers, No. 1: Can VEBAs alleviate retiree health care problems?. Publisher's VersionAbstract
The 2007 negotiations between the United Auto Workers (UAW) and Detroit automakers have focused national attention on a potentially innovative response to the long-term decline in retiree health insurance in the United States. The union agreed that an independent trust called a Voluntary Employees’ Beneficiary Association (VEBA) will assume responsibility for UAW retiree medical care at the three automakers. Other unionized employers now are looking at these so-called defeasance VEBAs as a way to free themselves of burdensome health-care legacy costs. An analysis of the largest one, at GM, suggests that the concept is a second-best option for unions able to retain employer-paid retiree coverage. However, it may be a viable alternative for those unable to fend off unilateral elimination by an employer. Both private- and public-sector unions and employers can draw important lessons from the defeasance VEBA agreed to by the UAW and GM, which will deploy innovative tactics to distribute cost and risk amongst the company, workers, and retirees. More broadly, the new VEBAs illuminate a gaping hole in the federal tax code, which offers few incentives for employees to save for postemployment medical needs even as employers have shifted the responsibility on them to do so. A VEBA is a flexible vehicle that could provide the most tax-efficient savings method for workers whose employer doesn’t offer retiree coverage. However, changes in federal law likely would be required for the concept to become widespread.
Capital Matters Newsletter
1/2008. “Capital Matters Newsletter” (Vol. 1, No. 2). Publisher's VersionAbstract
• Point/Counterpoint: Infrastructure Investments 
• What trustees can learn from San Diego 
• Putting labor rights into investment decisions 
• Trustee Perspective 
• Sharing retirement-funding risk: The Dutch Solution 
Benjamine I. Sachs. 2008. “Employment Law as Labor Law.” Cardozo Law Review, vol. 29:6, Pp. 2685-2748. Publisher's Version
Hollywood and the World: Export or Die
John Trumpbour. 2008. “Hollywood and the World: Export or Die.” In The Contemporary Hollywood Film Industry , edited by Paul McDonald and Janet Wasko. Malden, MA and Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.
Why Do We Work More than Keynes Expected?
Richard B. Freeman. 2008. “Why Do We Work More than Keynes Expected?” In Revisiting Keynes: Economic Possibilities for Our Grandchildren, edited by Lorenzo Pecchi and Gustavo Piga. Vol. Chapter 9. Cambridge: MIT Press.
2007
Capital Matters Newsletter
10/2007. “Capital Matters Newsletter” (Vol. 1, No. 1 ). Publisher's VersionAbstract
What can be done to improve America's retirement system? Is private equity really all it's cracked up to be? Find out in the premier edition of Capital Matters , the Pension and Capital Stewardship Project's newsletter. 
China: Banking Reform and Economic Development Revisited
John Trumpbour. 9/13/2007. “China: Banking Reform and Economic Development Revisited.” GT News. Publisher's Version
Reprinted in October 2008 at IDEAs Network (International Development Economics Associates),
What Workers Say: Employee Voice in the Anglo-american Workplace.
7/2007. What Workers Say: Employee Voice in the Anglo-american Workplace., Pp. 256. ILR Press.
7/2007. What Workers Say: Employee Voice in the Anglo-american Workplace., Pp. 256. ILR Press.
America Works: Critical Thoughts on the Exceptional US Labor Market
Richard B. Freeman. 4/2007. America Works: Critical Thoughts on the Exceptional US Labor Market, Pp. 206. Russell Sage Foundation.
2007. “The Crisis In Workplace Governance.” Comparative Labor Law & Policy Journal, Special Issue in Honor of Paul C. Weiler, , Vol. 28, 2, Pp. Introduction.
Labor Law Renewal
Benjamin I. Sachs. 2007. “Labor Law Renewal.” Harvard Law and Policy Review, 1, Pp. 375-400. Publisher's Version
Elaine Bernard. 2007. “A Supreme Decision: Collective Bargaining As a Constitutional Right.” Our Times, June/July, Pp. 16-17. Download PDF
Technological Revolutions and the Limits of Ethics in an Age of Commercialization
John Trumpbour. 2007. “Technological Revolutions and the Limits of Ethics in an Age of Commercialization.” In Nanotechnology: Societal Implications II, edited by Mihail C. Roco and William Sims Bainbridge. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer.

Pages