SEWP

2018 Jan 26

Vehicle Electrification in China: Preferences, Policy, and Technology Trajectories

12:00pm to 1:30pm

Location: 

Baker 103, Bloomberg Center, Harvard Business School

Economics of Science and Engineering Workshop

SPEAKER:  John Helveston ( Institute for Sustainable Energy at Boston University)
SEMINAR TITLE: Vehicle Electrification in China: Preferences, Policy, and Technology Trajectories

Paper 1: Will subsidies drive electric vehicle adoption? Measuring consumer preferences in the U.S. and China 
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While Iowa pushes STEM education, most job growth in technology

December 8, 2017

By Erin Murphy
Quad City Times

While all American students should have a working knowledge of science and math, it may be misleading to suggest the country faces a shortage of STEM workers, an expert on science education and policy told the Times.

“When it gets generalized to all of STEM, it’s misleading,” said Michael S. Teitelbaum, a senior research associate in the Labor and Worklife Program at Harvard Law School. “We’re misleading a lot of young people.”

Where the STEM Jobs Are (and Where They Aren’t)

November 2, 2017

By STEVE LOHR
New York TImes,  Education Life

"Michael S. Teitelbaum, an expert on science education and policy and LWP Senior Research Associate, believes that STEM advocates, often executives and lobbyists for technology companies, do a disservice when they raise the alarm that America is facing a worrying shortfall of STEM workers, based on shortages in a relative handful of fast-growing fields like data analytics, artificial intelligence, cloud computing and computer security."... Read more about Where the STEM Jobs Are (and Where They Aren’t)

2017 Sep 15

Innovation in the Cell Phone Markets of US and China

12:00pm to 1:30pm

Location: 

Baker L​i​brary, Harvard Business School

Economics of Science and Engineering Workshop
Given by: Richard Freeman (Harvard University and NBER), Jorn Boenke (Labor & Worklife Program, Harvard Law School), and Maggie Cheng (Stanford University) 

Cell phones are a product with continual innovation that have impacted lives around the world.  American adults spend 2 hours 51 minutes on their smartphone every day.  This paper analyzes the changing attributes of cell Phones in the two largest economies in the world, USA and China.  It uses hedonic price regressions to assess the speed of innovative change from data on prices matched with the attributes of new and older models.  It assesses the impact of innovations on cell phones on consumer well-being and assesses the seeming inconsistency between micro data on products with improved technological features and macro data that show sluggish growth of GDP per capita in the US.

Science and Engineering Careers in the United States: An Analysis of Markets and Employment
2009. Science and Engineering Careers in the United States: An Analysis of Markets and Employment, Pp. 408. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Abstract

Beginning in the early 2000s, there was an upsurge of national concern over the state of the science and engineering job market that sparked a plethora of studies, commission reports, and a presidential initiative, all stressing the importance of maintaining American competitiveness in these fields. Science and Engineering Careers in the United States is the first major academic study to probe the issues that underlie these concerns.

This volume provides new information on the economics of the postgraduate science and engineering job market, addressing such topics as the factors that determine the supply of PhDs, the career paths they follow after graduation, and the creation and use of knowledge as it is reflected by the amount of papers and patents produced. A distinguished team of contributors also explores the tensions between industry and academe in recruiting graduates, the influx of foreign-born doctorates, and the success of female doctorates. Science and Engineering Careers in the United States will raise new questions about stimulating innovation and growth in the American economy

National Bureau of Economic Research Conference Report
Immigration, International Collaboration, and Innovation: Science and Technology Policy in the Global Economy
Richard B. Freeman. 2015. “Immigration, International Collaboration, and Innovation: Science and Technology Policy in the Global Economy .” In NBER book: Innovation Policy and the Economy, Volume 15, edited by William R. Kerr, Josh Lerner, and Scott Stern, Pp. 153 - 175. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Globalization of scientific and technological knowledge has reduced the US share of world scientific activity; increased the foreign-born proportion of scientists and engineers in US universities and in the US labor market; and led to greater US scientific collaborations with other countries. China's massive investments in university education and R&D have in particular made it a special partner for the US in scientific work. These developments have substantial implications for US science and technology policy. This paper suggests that aligning immigration policies more closely to the influx of international students; granting fellowships to students working on turning scientific and technological into commercial innovations; and requiring firms with R&D tax credits or other government R&D funding develop "impact plans" to use their new knowledge to produce innovative products or processes in the US could help the country adjust to the changing global world of science and technology.
Falling Behind? Boom, Bust, and the Global Race for Scientific Talent
Michael S. Teitelbaum. 2014. Falling Behind? Boom, Bust, and the Global Race for Scientific Talent . Princeton University Press.Abstract

Is the United States falling behind in the global race for scientific and engineering talent? Are U.S. employers facing shortages of the skilled workers that they need to compete in a globalized world? Such claims from some employers and educators have been widely embraced by mainstream media and political leaders, and have figured prominently in recent policy debates about education, federal expenditures, tax policy, and immigration. Falling Behind? offers careful examinations of the existing evidence and of its use by those involved in these debates.

These concerns are by no means a recent phenomenon. Examining historical precedent, Michael Teitelbaum highlights five episodes of alarm about "falling behind" that go back nearly seventy years to the end of World War II. In each of these episodes the political system responded by rapidly expanding the supply of scientists and engineers, but only a few years later political enthusiasm or economic demand waned. Booms turned to busts, leaving many of those who had been encouraged to pursue science and engineering careers facing disheartening career prospects. Their experiences deterred younger and equally talented students from following in their footsteps—thereby sowing the seeds of the next cycle of alarm, boom, and bust.

Falling Behind? examines these repeated cycles up to the present, shedding new light on the adequacy of the science and engineering workforce for the current and future needs of the United States.

Nano Environment Project

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The National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) has provided funding to several university centers with the aim of advancing public awareness of nanotechnology. This website, designed at the Labor & Worklife Program at Harvard Law School, addresses the environmental impacts of...

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