LWP

2017 Dec 01

Beyond Harvey Weinstein: Workplace Sexual Harassment in the U.S.

12:00pm to 12:45pm

Location: 

WCC 1019 Classroom, Harvard Law School

Join Harassment/Assault Law Student Team for “Beyond Harvey Weinstein: Workplace Sexual Harassment in the U.S.” This panel discussion featuring employment law academics and practitioners will focus on the recent Harvey Weinstein scandal as a lens through which to view the general issue of workplace sexual harassment in the U.S. Non-pizza lunch will be served. 

Panelists:
-Sharon Block, Lecturer at Law, Executive Director of the Labor and Worklife Program at Harvard Law School
-Steve Churchill, Lecturer at Law, co-founder and principal of Fair Work, P.C., former director of the Employment Civil Rights Clinic at the Legal Services Center of Harvard Law School
-Michael L. Rosen, Partner, Foley Hoag, practitioner of employment law... Read more about Beyond Harvey Weinstein: Workplace Sexual Harassment in the U.S.

2017 Dec 01

Innovative Approaches to Migrant Worker Advocacy

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

Harvard Law School, WCC 3018

A talk with Mervat Jumhawee, El Hassan Workers’ Center (Jordan)
JJ Rosenbaum, Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School, will moderate the event.

Join us for a conversation on migrant workers’ rights in Jordan’s garment sector in the free trade zones with Mervat Jumhawee, Advocacy Officer for the El Hassan Workers’ Center. [Download Flyer]... Read more about Innovative Approaches to Migrant Worker Advocacy

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Supreme Court will decide if women can join together to fight sexual harassment at work

November 16, 2017

by Celine McNicholas, Labor Counsel, Economic Policy Institute and
Sharon Block, Executive Director of the LWP, Harvard Law School
American Constitution Society for Law and Policy 

Today, 24.7 million American workers have been forced to sign contracts that, as a condition of employment, require them to waive their rights to joining a class action lawsuit to address sexual harassment and other workplace disputes—instead these workers must act alone to resolve what is often systemic violations of employment protections.... Read more about Supreme Court will decide if women can join together to fight sexual harassment at work

American Constitution Society Logo
Celine McNicholas and Sharon Block. 11/16/2017. “Supreme Court will decide if women can join together to fight sexual harassment at work.” American Constitution Society .Abstract
Today, 24.7 million American workers have been forced to sign contracts that, as a condition of employment, require them to waive their rights to joining a class action lawsuit to address sexual harassment and other workplace disputes—instead these workers must act alone to resolve what is often systemic violations of employment protections. The National Labor Relations Board has determined that these arbitration agreements violate workers’ right under the National Labor Relations Act to join together for “mutual aid and protection.” Business interests—and the Trump administration—disagree. In Murphy Oil, the Supreme Court will decide whether workers have the right to come together to protect themselves from workplace issues like sexual harassment. The case could not be more relevant, or present the Justices with two more starkly divergent options.
Unger video thumbnail

What Should the Labor Movement Propose to the Country?

October 31, 2017

Lecture by Roberto Mangabeira Unger, Roscoe Pound Professor of Law, HLS, given at TUC Leading Change Conference, October 30-November 3, 2017, held by LWP at Harvard Law School. 
Introduction by Sharon Block, LWP and John Kelly, Birkbeck, University of London   [Video] 

We can't stop sexual harassment until we restructure corporate boards

We can't stop sexual harassment until we restructure corporate boards

November 7, 2017

By Sharon Block 
in Quartz

"If we are serious about making corporations more responsive to how their workers are treated, we need structural reform that will give workers a voice in the governance of their own work lives and the right to bring a greater diversity of views before the board."

Washington Post logo

It should be illegal to fire the cyclist who gave Trump the finger

November 8, 2017

By Benjamin Sachs, LWP and Harvard Law School
Washington Post

"Once the president makes the workplace a political battleground, the Constitution should ensure that the battle not be one-sided."

"these aren’t conventional times, and the conventional legal approach doesn’t make sense today. Briskman’s firing is unconscionable, and it should be illegal."

"Why? We have a president who doesn’t hesitate to insert himself into private workplace disputes, and is thereby turning the workplace into a battleground for politics and public policy. By...

Read more about It should be illegal to fire the cyclist who gave Trump the finger
2017 Dec 07

Harvard-ILO Roundtable on the Future of Work: Cambridge/Boston Case Studies on Global Technological Disruption

(All day)

Location: 

Harvard Law School

The objective of this roundtable discussion is to convene representatives from the tech sector, select Harvard/MIT/Boston area faculty and researchers, and members of the ILO Research Department and New York Office in order to explore the future of work in an era of rapid technological change.... Read more about Harvard-ILO Roundtable on the Future of Work: Cambridge/Boston Case Studies on Global Technological Disruption

2017 Oct 30

TUC Leading Change

Mon Oct 30 (All day) to Fri Nov 3 (All day)

Location: 

Harvard Law School

A training program and exchange of ideas with senior officials from unions affiliated with the Trades Union Congress (TUC) of Great Britain.

[Video] of "What Should the Labor Movement Propose to the Country?" by Roberto Mangabeira Unger, Roscoe Pound Professor of Law, Harvard Law School
Introduction by John Kelly, Birkbeck, University of London
... Read more about TUC Leading Change

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