LWP

Benjamin I Sachs

Benjamin I. Sachs

Faculty Co-Director, Labor and Worklife Program
Professor, Harvard Law School

Benjamin Sachs is the Kestnbaum Professor of Labor and Industry at Harvard Law School and a leading expert in the field of labor law and labor relations.  Professor Sachs teaches courses in labor law, employment law, and law and social change, and his writing focuses on union organizing and unions in American politics.

p: 617-384-5984
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The germ of innovation: The lessons from accelerated COVID-19 vaccine development

May 24, 2021

EMRAN QURESHI
Opinion
THE GLOBE AND MAIL

There is one bright flicker of hope: biotech. The spread of the pandemic is being slowed by the emergence of effective vaccines that were developed and deployed in fewer than 11 months. This is an extraordinary advance from past vaccine development, which ranged from five to 10 years. Two of the first vaccines that were out of the starting gate and jabbed into arms were from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna.... Read more about The germ of innovation: The lessons from accelerated COVID-19 vaccine development

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Mike  Firestone

Interim Managing Director
LWP Program Fellow
Research on misclassification, wage theft, and building worker power
Mike Firestone is an attorney, labor policy advisor, and political strategist with a background in campaigns and government service. His current areas of work include misclassification, wage theft, and building worker power. Prior to joining LWP, Mike led voter protection efforts for the Biden-Harris campaign in Michigan and served as an assistant attorney general and Chief of Staff to Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey, overseeing a broad range of legal and policy matters, including the rulemaking and implementation of the Massachusetts paid sick time law.... Read more about Mike  Firestone
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President Biden’s climate summit and how the world celebrated Earth Day

April 22, 2021

Sky News Climate Show
Anna Jones
Interview 

"Climate adaptation: How to build resilience in a changing world"

Are Targets on emission reductions the right focus or should more attention be given to adapting and giving resources to adapting life to a world that is already experiencing changes in temperatures and climate. Dr. Xi (Sisi) Hu, Program Fellow, LWP,  states, "...

Read more about President Biden’s climate summit and how the world celebrated Earth Day
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After Amazon: Labor tries to regroup in wake of Alabama loss

April 10, 2021

By PAUL WISEMAN and
ANNE D'INNOCENZIO
AP News

Despite the strongest public support and the most sympathetic president in years, the American labor movement just suffered a stinging defeat -- again.

Amazon warehouse workers in Bessemer, Alabama, overwhelmingly voted against joining the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union in much-anticipated election results announced Friday.

Amazon and business groups celebrated the decision, saying warehouse workers got a chance to weigh the pros and cons of union membership -- and voted to reject it....

Read more about After Amazon: Labor tries to regroup in wake of Alabama loss
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Faculty Director Emeritus receives Order of Canada

March 19, 2021

Paul Weiler, our faculty co-director emeritus received the Order of Canada on March 19, 2021. It is the second highest honour for merit in the system of orders, decorations, and medals of Canada, after the Order of Merit. The order recognizes the achievement of outstanding merit or distinguished service by Canadians who made a major difference to Canada through lifelong contributions in every field of endeavour, as well as the efforts made by non-Canadians who have made the world better by their actions.

The Office of the Governor-General of Canada noted the...

Read more about Faculty Director Emeritus receives Order of Canada
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Celine McNicholas

LWP Fellow
Celine McNicholas is EPI’s director of government affairs and labor counsel. An attorney, her current areas of work include a wide range of workers’ rights issues, including labor and employment law, collective bargaining, and union organizing. She was a core member of EPI’s Perkins Project on Worker Rights and Wages Policy Watch, an online resource that tracked federal actions affecting working people and the economy during the first year of the Trump administration. McNicholas continues to monitor and analyze the Trump administration’s labor and employment policies.
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How Covid-19 Is Helping Robots Take Your Job (Podcast)

December 16, 2020

Stephanie Flanders
Stephanomics Podcast
Bloomberg

Adding robots to factories, retail stores or mines was historically seen as a job killer by workers and the unions that support them. But this year, automation has allowed sectors of the economy to continue producing with fewer people, minimizing the coronavirus risk for workers. U.S. economy reporter Olivia Rockeman explains what that might mean in the long term and what needs to happen to help the displaced. 

Host Stephanie Flanders talks with Harvard Economist Richard Freeman about how 2020 has changed the world of work and what the future will hold. 

Professional Athletes Went On Strike Over Police Brutality. So Let’s Call It A Strike.

August 27, 2020

By Dave Jamieson
HuffPost

When the Milwaukee Bucks announced Wednesday that they would not be playing their NBA playoff game due to the police shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin, the media couldn’t agree on what to call this extraordinary thing that was unfolding. Were the players mounting a protest? Were they initiating a boycott? Or were they carrying out a strike or work stoppage?

Sharon Block, director of the Labor and Worklife Program at Harvard Law School, said the situation brought to mind the walkout led by employees of Wayfair, the online home furnishings retailer, because the company was supplying beds to U.S. detention centers for migrant children. The dispute was about social injustice ― not working conditions ― and the workers were asking the broader community to stand by them in condemning it.

“Whatever the label is, this is about solidarity,” Block said of the athletes’ move. “It’s not just to advance their own interest, but to lead on a bigger public policy issue. ... They’re asking the public to join them in saying there’s something more important going on than sports.” 

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Creativity And Diversity: How Exposure To Different People Affects Our Thinking

July 27, 2020

Shankar Vedantam
Jennifer Schmidt
Parth Shah
Tara Boyle
Hidden Brain Podcast, NPR

Social scientist Adam Galinsky has found that people who have deep relationships with someone from another country become more creative and score higher on routine creativity tests.

"There's something about deeply understanding and learning about another culture that's transformative," Adam says.

Harvard economics professor Richard Freeman has an interesting study on diversity in science. He found that published scientific research receives greater attention if the authors are ethnically diverse.... Read more about Creativity And Diversity: How Exposure To Different People Affects Our Thinking

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