LWP

Benjamin I Sachs

Benjamin I. Sachs

Faculty Co-Director, Labor and Worklife Program
Professor, Harvard Law School

Benjamin Sachs is the Kestnbaum Professor of Labor and Industry at Harvard Law School and a leading expert in the field of labor law and labor relations.  Professor Sachs teaches courses in labor law, employment law, and law and social change, and his writing focuses on union organizing and unions in American politics.

p: 617-384-5984
Sharon Block photo

Sharon Block

Executive Director, Labor and Worklife Program
Professor of Practice, Harvard Law School
Former Executive Director, Labor and Worklife Program 2017-2021

Sharon Block is a Professor of Practice and Executive Director of the Labor and Worklife Program at Harvard Law School. Piror to returning to Harvard, she served as the Acting Administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs in President Joe Biden’s White House.

From 2017 to 2021, Block led the Labor and Worklife Program. During this time, she launched the Clean Slate for Worker Power project, which is a comprehensive policy initiative focused on fundamental redesign of labor law with the aspiration to enable all working people to create the collective economic and political power necessary to build an equitable economy and politics.... Read more about Sharon Block

Poor mothers get shut out of the Child Tax Credit, our research finds

Poor mothers get shut out of the Child Tax Credit, our research finds

May 4, 2022

Analysis by Ashley Nunes
Washington Post

With the midterm elections coming, Democrats are trying to push through key legislative priorities — including
renewing the child tax credit (CTC), which gives working parents a credit for each child and will expire in December
2025. No one doubts that it will be renewed; the credit has broad bipartisan public support.

Our study shows that over 1.5 million parents — 80 percent of whom are women — may be excluded from the full
child tax credit despite working. At the current federal minimum wage, we estimate that a...

Read more about Poor mothers get shut out of the Child Tax Credit, our research finds
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Workers at a second Amazon facility on Staten Island just voted against unionizing. But that doesn’t mean the movement is slowing down

May 2, 2022

BY COLIN LODEWICK
Fortune

Though a win would have inevitably injected more momentum into the current labor organizing push, today’s loss still has the potential, according to labor experts, to further mobilize workers by laying bare the lengths to which corporations will go to defeat unionization drives.  

 

Regardless of today’s loss, the unprecedented nature of the first victory will likely keep the movement energized. “[Workers] were told that Amazon was too big, that the...

Read more about Workers at a second Amazon facility on Staten Island just voted against unionizing. But that doesn’t mean the movement is slowing down
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Starbucks Store Unionizing Surge Tests Cash-Strapped Labor Board

April 27, 2022

Ian Kullgren and Robert Iafolla
Bloomberg Law

 

The recent deluge of union elections at Starbucks Corp. stores is pushing the federal labor board to its limit, reflecting a broader influx in labor action as the pandemic winds down.

Flat funding and a restless labor force have created a near perfect storm for the National Labor Relations Board, charged with overseeing every private-sector union election. Election petitions have already swelled by 57% in the first half of the 2021 fiscal year as unfair labor practice charges rose by 14%. At the...

Read more about Starbucks Store Unionizing Surge Tests Cash-Strapped Labor Board
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Company overseeing Boston garage demolition has faced lawsuits from other injured workers

March 29, 2022

Beth Healy and Christine Willmsen
WBUR

Peter Monsini, who died in a tragic accident at a Boston construction site Saturday, was not the first worker to be seriously injured on a JDC Demolition Co. worksite.

The Brockton-based company has paid large settlements in recent years in at least three lawsuits brought by workers who got hurt on the job and blamed JDC and other contractors.

Mark Erlich, a fellow at Harvard Law School's Labor and Worklife Program and a retired officer of the New England Regional Council of Carpenters, said big job sites like these are supposed to have many checks on safety protocols. But things don't always go right.

"Every now and then, there will be one of these tragic incidents," he said, "that reminds people why construction is so dangerous."... Read more about Company overseeing Boston garage demolition has faced lawsuits from other injured workers

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The Amazon Labor Union’s Fight With Amazon Is Far From Over

April 13, 2022

BY JOSEFA VELASQUEZ
ADDITIONAL REPORTING BY CLAUDIA IRIZARRY APONTE
The City, NYC

The retail giant is challenging NLRB certification, and a second vote at a nearby warehouse looms ahead. That’s all before anyone sits down at the bargaining table to discuss a contract.

Aside from Amazon’s objections to the vote, it could be a long road to getting the company and the ALU to agree on a contract. While the NLRB requires employers to bargain in good faith once the...

Read more about The Amazon Labor Union’s Fight With Amazon Is Far From Over
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Amazon workers won the company's first US union — here's what happens next

April 4, 2022

Max Zahn 
Yahoo Finance

In the coming days, the Amazon Labor Union may face a challenge from Amazon over the legitimacy of the election results that, if successful, could overturn the outcome. If the union survives that potential challenge, it will enter negotiations with the company over the contours of a union contract at the facility that will likely stretch on for months.

If Amazon foregoes a challenge of the results or the...

Read more about Amazon workers won the company's first US union — here's what happens next
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Amazon workers in Staten Island have unionized in historic win

April 1, 2022

By Anna Kramer
Protocol

Amazon workers have voted to unionize for the first time in the company's history in the United States, securing a sweeping and unexpected victory in a National Labor Relations Board election for a group of around 8,000 workers at a warehouse in Staten Island, New York.

"Amazon is a corporation with massive essentially unlimited resources which it has deployed to stop workers from exercising their right to organize, and that nonetheless the workers have been able to...

Read more about Amazon workers in Staten Island have unionized in historic win
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Amazon Warehouse Workers Just Redefined What’s Possible for U.S. Labor

April 2, 2022

 By 
Bloomberg

Overall U.S. unionization declined last year, despite 2021’s wave of prominent strike authorizations, mass resignations, and other organizing efforts. But Smalls’s win signals that there’s an opening for workers, one that many others are now more likely to explore. “The psychological and symbolic importance of a win can’t be overstated,” says Sharon Block, a former Obama Labor Department policy chief who now directs Harvard Law School...

Read more about Amazon Warehouse Workers Just Redefined What’s Possible for U.S. Labor
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Labor law expert Sharon Block appointed professor of practice

March 15, 2022

By HLS News Staff
Harvard Law Today

Sharon Block, a labor policy expert who most recently served as acting administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs in the Biden administration, has been appointed professor of practice at Harvard Law School, effective July 1.

Block, who currently serves as the executive director of Harvard Law School’s Labor and Worklife Program, first joined HLS in 2017, where, with Professor ...

Read more about Labor law expert Sharon Block appointed professor of practice
Sharon Block Returns to Harvard as Professor of Practice and Executive Director of the Labor and Worklife Program

Sharon Block Returns to Harvard as Professor of Practice and Executive Director of the Labor and Worklife Program

March 18, 2022

Benjamin Sachs
OnLabor Blog

I am so happy to share with OnLabor readers the news that Sharon Block is returning to Harvard Law School as a professor of practice and the Executive Director of the Labor and Worklife Program. Sharon’s return is a great boon for labor law at Harvard and an incredible opportunity for us to consider the future of LWP, including the Clean...

Read more about Sharon Block Returns to Harvard as Professor of Practice and Executive Director of the Labor and Worklife Program
The State of Labor in the State of the Union

The State of Labor in the State of the Union

March 3, 2022

Sharon Block
OnLabor Blog

I think it is fair to say that based on President Biden’s first State of the Union (SOTU) address, the state of labor’s interests in the Biden Administration is strong. Even before President Biden entered the House Chamber Tuesday night, Biden sent a signal about how central the labor movement is to his presidency. Starting with President Reagan, presidents have used invitations to sit with the First Lady during SOTU as symbols of their values. ...

Read more about The State of Labor in the State of the Union

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