Staff

2017 Dec 01

Beyond Harvey Weinstein: Workplace Sexual Harassment in the U.S.

12:00pm to 12:45pm

Location: 

WCC 1019 Classroom, Harvard Law School

Join Harassment/Assault Law Student Team for “Beyond Harvey Weinstein: Workplace Sexual Harassment in the U.S.” This panel discussion featuring employment law academics and practitioners will focus on the recent Harvey Weinstein scandal as a lens through which to view the general issue of workplace sexual harassment in the U.S. Non-pizza lunch will be served. 

Panelists:
-Sharon Block, Lecturer at Law, Executive Director of the Labor and Worklife Program at Harvard Law School
-Steve Churchill, Lecturer at Law, co-founder and principal of Fair Work, P.C., former director of the Employment Civil Rights Clinic at the Legal Services Center of Harvard Law School
-Michael L. Rosen, Partner, Foley Hoag, practitioner of employment law... Read more about Beyond Harvey Weinstein: Workplace Sexual Harassment in the U.S.

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Supreme Court will decide if women can join together to fight sexual harassment at work

November 16, 2017

by Celine McNicholas, Labor Counsel, Economic Policy Institute and
Sharon Block, Executive Director of the LWP, Harvard Law School
American Constitution Society for Law and Policy 

Today, 24.7 million American workers have been forced to sign contracts that, as a condition of employment, require them to waive their rights to joining a class action lawsuit to address sexual harassment and other workplace disputes—instead these workers must act alone to resolve what is often systemic violations of employment protections.... Read more about Supreme Court will decide if women can join together to fight sexual harassment at work

American Constitution Society Logo
Celine McNicholas and Sharon Block. 11/16/2017. “Supreme Court will decide if women can join together to fight sexual harassment at work.” American Constitution Society .Abstract
Today, 24.7 million American workers have been forced to sign contracts that, as a condition of employment, require them to waive their rights to joining a class action lawsuit to address sexual harassment and other workplace disputes—instead these workers must act alone to resolve what is often systemic violations of employment protections. The National Labor Relations Board has determined that these arbitration agreements violate workers’ right under the National Labor Relations Act to join together for “mutual aid and protection.” Business interests—and the Trump administration—disagree. In Murphy Oil, the Supreme Court will decide whether workers have the right to come together to protect themselves from workplace issues like sexual harassment. The case could not be more relevant, or present the Justices with two more starkly divergent options.
We can't stop sexual harassment until we restructure corporate boards

We can't stop sexual harassment until we restructure corporate boards

November 7, 2017

By Sharon Block 
in Quartz

"If we are serious about making corporations more responsive to how their workers are treated, we need structural reform that will give workers a voice in the governance of their own work lives and the right to bring a greater diversity of views before the board."

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