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Adding salary ranges to job listings stops people from wasting their time

May 16, 2022

Terri Gerstein
Think, NBC News

Laws requiring disclosure of salary ranges in job postings, like other pay transparency laws, reduce gender and race disparities.

Laws requiring disclosure of salary ranges in job postings, like other pay transparency laws, reduce gender and race disparities. Women still earn far less than men — 83 cents to the dollar in 2022 — and this gap is even worse for women of color: Black women made 58 cents on average, and Latina women 49 cents, for every dollar a non-Latino white man earned last year. Research has found that women are...

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Poor mothers get shut out of the Child Tax Credit, our research finds

Poor mothers get shut out of the Child Tax Credit, our research finds

May 4, 2022

Analysis by Ashley Nunes
Washington Post

With the midterm elections coming, Democrats are trying to push through key legislative priorities — including
renewing the child tax credit (CTC), which gives working parents a credit for each child and will expire in December
2025. No one doubts that it will be renewed; the credit has broad bipartisan public support.

Our study shows that over 1.5 million parents — 80 percent of whom are women — may be excluded from the full
child tax credit despite working. At the current federal minimum wage, we estimate that a...

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Enforcers take action to protect building superintendents and grocery and construction workers

March 22, 2022

Terri Gerstein
Working Economics Blog
Economics Policy Institute

A snapshot of state and local enforcement actions across the country

Recent cases brought by state and local enforcers include the recovery of $130,000 for New York City building superintendents, who were paid no wages at all, and a recovery of nearly $220,000 for workers in a Seattle specialty bar and grocery store based on minimum wage and paid sick leave violations. In addition, prosecutors on both sides of the country took action against contractors in the construction...

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Enforcers take action to protect workers from workplace violations at Domino’s and Family Dollar stores

February 22, 2022

Terri Gerstein
Working Economics Blog
Economics Policy Institute

A snapshot of state and local enforcement actions across the country

Recent cases brought by state and local enforcers include the recovery of $2 million for workers of a Seattle Domino’s franchisee that underpaid workers and didn’t give required notice of schedules; citation of Massachusetts Family Dollar stores for $1.5 million for thousands of meal break violations; and prosecution of several cases involving egregious violations of wage payment, unemployment insurance, and workers’...

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Amazon Reportedly Considered Spending $20,000 a Week on Consultants in Failed Staten Island Union Busting

April 21, 2022

ByMack DeGeurin
Gizmodo

New Amazon documents filed with the U.S. The Department of Labor suggests the company engaged consultants for a rate of up to $20,000 per week in an aggressive effort to persuade workers to abandon unionization efforts. The documents were first spotted by Insider on Tuesday, and were ...

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Covid mask mandates for travel have been lifted. Where do we go from here?

April 19, 2022

By Terri Gerstein
Think 
NBC News

Offering some options where masks are mandated would help enable continued accessibility of travel to everyone. People with health conditions and disabilities shouldn’t de facto be shut out of travel or forced to risk their health to conduct their daily lives. 

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Your Tesla is killing the planet

April 17, 2022

By Ashley Nunes
The Dallas Morning News

Not quite. Whether EVs reduce emissions lies in understanding the “counterfactual.” What would happen in the absence of an EV being used? This comparison is often framed as a choice between an EV and a gas guzzler. When viewed side by side, the EV does come out on top. But that’s not the whole story. Because EVs generate more emissions during the manufacturing process relative to conventional autos (producing batteries is no small feat), and they must drive further to “burn off” their production emissions. Not...

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Company overseeing Boston garage demolition has faced lawsuits from other injured workers

March 29, 2022

Beth Healy and Christine Willmsen
WBUR

Peter Monsini, who died in a tragic accident at a Boston construction site Saturday, was not the first worker to be seriously injured on a JDC Demolition Co. worksite.

The Brockton-based company has paid large settlements in recent years in at least three lawsuits brought by workers who got hurt on the job and blamed JDC and other contractors.

Mark Erlich, a fellow at Harvard Law School's Labor and Worklife Program and a retired officer of the New England Regional Council of Carpenters, said big job sites like these are supposed to have many checks on safety protocols. But things don't always go right.

"Every now and then, there will be one of these tragic incidents," he said, "that reminds people why construction is so dangerous."... Read more about Company overseeing Boston garage demolition has faced lawsuits from other injured workers

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Amazon Is Playing Dirty to Stop a Second Warehouse From Unionizing

April 18, 2022

BY LUIS FELIZ LEON
Jacobin

In a massive victory, Amazon workers recently won a union at a warehouse in New York. So now the company is trying every trick in the union-busting playbook to throttle worker organizing at a second facility.

One of the consultant firms advertises that it offers “a team of men and women who represent bi-lingual, ethnic and cultural diversity” that will “meet with the individual employees, establishing both rapport and credibility,” and notes that its services will help address situations in which the company’s management and...

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What Amazon and Starbucks Don’t Let Us Know

April 13, 2022

By Terri Gerstein
The American Prospect

There are gaping holes in what the law requires employers to reveal about their campaigns to keep their workers from unionizing.

Instead of hemorrhaging money hiring anti-union consultants to mimic their workforce’s demographics while spewing tired anti-union tropes, companies could figure out how to work effectively with unions. They could recognize that poor treatment of workers is unsustainable and accept that the tide is turning. They might well discover that a unionized workforce ...

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Current electric vehicles subsidies fail to reduce overall emissions, says Harvard Law study

April 7, 2022

By Rachel Reed
HLS News Staff
Harvard Law Today

New research suggests that federal incentives should be redesigned to support secondhand purchasers — typically less affluent households — to achieve cars’ emissions savings.

Subsidies offered by the federal government for the purchase of new electric vehicles (EVs) may actually increase total greenhouse gas emissions without similar aid for secondhand buyers, concludes a new study led by Ashley Nunes, Ph.D., a fellow at...

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Ashley Nunes, Lucas Woodley, and Philip Rossetti. 4/4/2022. “Re-thinking procurement incentives for electric vehicles to achieve net-zero emissions.” Nature Sustainability.Abstract

Procurement incentives are a widely leveraged policy lever to stimulate electric vehicle (EV) sales. However, their effectiveness in reducing transportation emissions depends on the behavioural characteristics of EV adopters. When an EV is used, under what conditions and by whom dictates whether or not these vehicles can deliver emissions reductions. Here, we document that replacing gasoline powered vehicles with EVs may—depending on behavioural characteristics—increase, not decrease, emissions. We further show that counterfactual vehicle inventory—how many vehicles a household would own absent an EV purchase—is an important influencer of these effects. We conclude that achieving emissions reductions using EVs requires redesigning procurement incentive programmes in a manner that (re)distributes incentives towards the second-hand EV market. Doing so would not only facilitate emissions reductions but also address fiscal prudency and regressivity concerns associated with these programmes.

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