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What Should the Labor Movement Propose to the Country?

October 31, 2017

Lecture by Roberto Mangabeira Unger, Roscoe Pound Professor of Law, HLS, given at TUC Leading Change Conference, October 30-November 3, 2017, held by LWP at Harvard Law School. 
Introduction by Sharon Block, LWP and John Kelly, Birkbeck, University of London   [Video] 

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Why Resident Advisers could benefit from a union

September 11, 2017

By Paige Szmodis, member of the AFSCME Union Scholars Program attending URSINUS COLLEGE


"Collective student power can ensure that students can have a voice when negotiating with people in administrative positions. Students should have an opportunity to join together, ask questions, and put forth a document that allows them to decide what working conditions are reasonable, safe and healthy. Contracts serve as a reference point if things go wrong or when power has been abused."

Ph.D. Françoise Carré and Randall Wilson. 4/25/2005. The Social and Economic Costs of Employee Misclassification in the Maine Construction Industry . Cambridge, MA: Construction Policy Research Center Labor and Worklife Program, Harvard Law School and Harvard School of Public Health. Publisher's VersionAbstract
You can call a construction worker by any other name , but they're still a construction worker, right? Not according to a recent study sponsored by Harvard Law School's Labor and Worklife Program. Construction workers, whose job duties remain unchanged, seem to be turning into "independent contractors," a label that's not only misleading but carries with it important worker compensation insurance and tax collection implications. The study, "The Social and Economic Costs of Employee Misclassification in Construction," conducted by Dr. Francoise Carre and Randall Wilson at UMass Boston's Center for Social Policy documents an alarming pattern of employee misclassification in both the Maine and Massachusetts construction industries between 2001-2003
Françoise Carré and Randall Wilson. 12/17/2004. The Social and Economic Costs of Employee Misclassification in Construction. Cambridge, MA: Construction Policy Research Center and Labor and Worklife Program, Harvard Law School and Harvard School of Public Health. Publisher's VersionAbstract
You can call a construction worker by any other name, but they're still a construction worker, right? Not according to a recent study sponsored by Harvard Law School's Labor and Worklife Program. Construction workers, whose job duties remain unchanged, seem to be turning into "independent contractors," a label that's not only misleading but carries with it important worker compensation insurance and tax collection implications. The study, "The Social and Economic Costs of Employee Misclassification in Construction," conducted by Dr. Francoise Carre and Randall Wilson at UMass Boston's Center for Social Policy documents an alarming pattern of employee misclassification in Massachusetts construction industriy between 2001-2003.