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The Daily Climate Show: Deforestation in the most precious parts of the Brazilian Amazon reaches record levels

September 28, 2021

Daily Climate Show
Sky News

On the Daily Climate Show, we investigate who's behind industrial-scale deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon and why. Plus, the latest from the pre-COP26 youth event and our guests debate how Greta Thunberg has had such an impact on the world.

Dr. Xi (Sisi) HuLWP Program Fellow, discuss Greta and Amazon deforestation at 13:10 for about 7 mins.

Listen to interview... Read more about The Daily Climate Show: Deforestation in the most precious parts of the Brazilian Amazon reaches record levels

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Retail Jobs Are Treated As A Temporary Bridge To Something Better. But Why?

September 27, 2021

Alina Selyukh
NPR News

For a long time, for a lot of people, jobs in retail were a career. Now, though, those jobs are largely seen as temporary. What exactly happened?

Nobody is in retail because they really want to be (laughter). It's a bridge to another place. And it would be really nice if we could make that environment so that that's not necessarily the case because some people don't have that choice.

SELYUKH: The corporate pitch for free college tuition is to help workers grow within the company. But it can also be seen as an acknowledgement that...

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A Growing Trend: Treating Wage Theft As A Criminal Offense

September 23, 2021

By Daniela Porat
Law 360

The need for criminal prosecution of wage theft and other employment law violations has become all the more imperative, said Terri Gerstein, the director of the State and Local Enforcement Project at the Harvard Law School Labor and Worklife Program.

"I think that the situation of working people in our country has become dire," she said. "One of the benefits of criminal prosecution is it just sort of changes the calculus … there's a whole other set of consequences other than just, 'OK, I'm going to pay...

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Comment: Unions not against vax mandate; they just want a say

Comment: Unions not against vax mandate; they just want a say

September 16, 2021

Terri Gerstein
Washington Post

Most unions have strongly supported vaccination efforts, often including mandates. But they also want a place at the table in relation to implementation.

“Labor unions are a microcosm of the society we live in,” Patricia Campos-Medina, executive director of Cornell University’s Worker Institute, told Yahoo News. “The same political divide we have right now exists within the rank and file of unions.” Unions represent and give voice to their members — of course they want ...

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Other People’s Rotten Jobs Are Bad for Them. And for You.

Other People’s Rotten Jobs Are Bad for Them. And for You.

September 6, 2021

Terri Gerstein
Opinoin
NY Times

I enforced workplace laws in New York State for the better part of two decades, and this case stands out to me, because it so clearly exemplifies why all of us should care about workers’ rights. When people have bad working conditions and no voice on the job, it’s obviously bad for them. But the impact of rotten jobs — those with low pay, long hours, bad treatment, or no worker voice — radiates far beyond the workers themselves. Other people’s rotten jobs affect our collective health, safety and well-being.

We should care about...

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Robocabs could make climate change worse, say researchers at Harvard, MIT

August 24, 2021

By HLS News Staff
Harvard Law Today

A new study shows that electric, autonomous cabs could increase greenhouse gas emissions — not reduce them

 

A new study led by Dr. Ashley Nunes, a fellow at the Labor and Worklife Program at Harvard Law School, concluded that, counterintuitively, fleets of electric, autonomous taxis could dramatically increase energy consumption and emissions that contribute to climate change — not reduce them.

“While electric vehicles themselves have lower emissions than traditional gasoline-powered...

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REINVENTING THE WORKWEEK

August 30, 2021

by Meira Gebel
Dame Magazine

For many American workers, the traditional eight-hour-plus days, five days a week is no longer tolerable. Can we reimagine the status quo?

“People want the ability to make a living, have work-life balance, and be able to care for their families,” said Gerstein, who is also the director of the project on state and local enforcement at the Harvard Law School labor and worklife program. “This includes a predictable schedule with sufficient pay, and where one job should be enough.” 

“I think it’s...

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INTERVIEW: VOICE ESEA TEAM TALKS COLLECTING UK HATE CRIME DATA AND COMBATING RACISM

August 13, 2021

YINSEY WANG
WeAreResonate.com

Abbey Wong, Sandii Ng and Sisi Hu are members of Voice ESEA, a non-profit organisation set up this year. Voice ESEA is on a mission to eliminate racial discrimination against East and South East Asians (ESEA) by educating about, and amplifying voices of ESEA within the community.

Abbey Wong is the Data Team Lead and Sandii Ng is a Project Manager of Voice ESEA, and are founding members. Sisi Hu has helped...

Read more about INTERVIEW: VOICE ESEA TEAM TALKS COLLECTING UK HATE CRIME DATA AND COMBATING RACISM
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How Joe Biden's order on noncompetes could make it easier to quit your job

July 27, 2021

BY IRINA IVANOVA
CBS News

The president's July 9 executive order takes aim at an increasingly common and oft-criticized feature of the labor market: noncompete agreements. Under these restrictive agreements, which cover an estimated one-fifth to one-half of private-sector workers, employees give up future work in their industry as a condition of keeping their current job. 

Terri Gerstein, director of the state and local enforcement program at the Harvard Law School Labor and Worklife Program, noted there were other legal ways, including...

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In Memoriam Paul C. Weiler LL.M. ’65: 1939-2021: North America’s foremost labor law scholar and the founder of ‘sports and the law

July 22, 2021

By Christine Perkins
HLS News

Paul C. Weiler LL.M. ’65, the Henry J. Friendly Professor of Law Emeritus at Harvard Law School, renowned as North America’s foremost labor law scholar and the founder of sports and the law, died July 7 after a long illness.

Weiler left a multifaceted intellectual legacy. An expert in labor law, he pioneered protections for workers and constitutional reform in his native Canada. He produced seminal scholarship that framed the debate about U.S. labor law in ways that endure to this day. He also founded the field of...

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Paul Weiler, 1939-2021: Faculty Co-Director Emeritus of the Labor and Worklife Program

July 7, 2021

With sadness, we report the death of Paul C. Weiler, the Henry J. Friendly Professor of Law, Emeritus at Harvard Law School as well as the Faculty Co-Director Emeritus of the Labor and Worklife Program (LWP) at Harvard Law School (HLS).

Paul Weiler stood as one of the preeminent figures in several fields of legal scholarship: labor law, entertainment law, and sports law, as well as in constitutional reform and labor dispute resolution in his native land of Canada. He also made significant contributions on legal remedies for medical malpractice and worker disability.

... Read more about Paul Weiler, 1939-2021: Faculty Co-Director Emeritus of the Labor and Worklife Program
There’s a Way to Get More People Vaccinated—and It Doesn’t Involve the Lottery

There’s a Way to Get More People Vaccinated—and It Doesn’t Involve the Lottery

July 1, 2021

By Terri Gerstein and Lorelei Salas
The Nation

In light of the widespread jobsite transmission of the virus, and Covid-19’s devastating impact on working people, we should also do everything possible to eliminate obstacles for essential workers. Fortunately, there are two non-flashy but surefire approaches to boost rates among the many workers who want the vaccine but haven’t had it: first, pass paid sick leave laws covering the shot as well as side effects; and second, turn to unions, worker organizations, and others that are already known to and trusted by workers and their communities. 

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The germ of innovation: The lessons from accelerated COVID-19 vaccine development

May 24, 2021

EMRAN QURESHI
Opinion
THE GLOBE AND MAIL

There is one bright flicker of hope: biotech. The spread of the pandemic is being slowed by the emergence of effective vaccines that were developed and deployed in fewer than 11 months. This is an extraordinary advance from past vaccine development, which ranged from five to 10 years. Two of the first vaccines that were out of the starting gate and jabbed into arms were from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna.... Read more about The germ of innovation: The lessons from accelerated COVID-19 vaccine development

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Kim Kardashian is being sued for employment practices that are sadly common

May 26, 2021

Terri Gerstein
NBC News THINK 

In the latest celebrity labor scandal, reality TV star Kim Kardashian West was sued in Los Angeles Superior Court on Monday by seven workers accusing her of wage theft, retaliation and more. They literally worked on the grounds of her home. Kardashian West’s response to these allegations? “These workers were hired and paid through a third-party vendor,” her spokesperson said. “Kim is not party to the agreement made between the vendor and their workers, therefore she is not responsible for how the vendor manages their business...

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How to End Wage Theft

May 10, 2021

Chris Bangert-Drowns
WPFW Monday Morning Quarterback Radio Show

Alexia Fernandez Campbell, Senior Reporter at the Center for Public Integrity, and Terri Gerstein, Senior Fellow at the Economic Policy Institute and Director of the State and Local Enforcement Project at the Harvard Law School Labor and Worklife Program, talk with reporter Chris Bangert-Drowns about wage theft during the pandemic, potential enforcement failures by the Department of Labor, and how to best end the practice.

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